Conflict Bees

£125.00

As the Urbanisation of human dwellings increases in order to accommodate an ever increasing human population, the natural nesting sites of the United Kingdom’s pollinators such as Bumble and Honeybees are being compromised. This is causing these critically important insects to find new nesting locations, increasingly our homes and places of work are becoming the chosen location of colonies of these stinging insects bringing them into direct conflict with mankind.

This accredited course is classroom based and has been designed as an introduction to inform all interested stakeholders such as educators, homeowners, local councils and professional pest controllers about the identification, nesting habits and behaviour of the most common pollinator species of Bumble and Honeybee that may be encountered as a conflict species.

This informed knowledge gained from this course can then be used to decide the best course of action for each species, such as information advice and guidance for co-habitation, interim seasonal remedial action or the eventual live removal of the colony by suitably trained and qualified individuals.

Description

Learning Outcomes

  • To fully understand mankind’s dependence on pollinators for the human food supply chain.
  • To be able to identify the most common species of Bumblebee (Bombus) colonies as a non-pest species that may come into conflict with mankind.
  • To be able to positively identify Honeybee (Apis) colonies as a non-pest species that may come into conflict with mankind.
  • To understand the importance of only interfering with and removing conflict Bee colonies as an absolute last resort.
  • To understand the seasonal differences and behaviour between the different Bee species (Bombus, Apis) and Wasps (Vespula Vulgaris).
  • To be able to recognise the different types of nests that each of the species build.
  • To be able to calculate colony numbers and behavioural traits after species identification in order to provide stakeholders with full information on the species in order to allow informed decision making to resolve conflict situations.
  • To be able to give stakeholders information, advice and guidance on seasonal co-habitation and remedial options when the live removal of the colony is not viable.
  • To be able to give stakeholders information, advice and guidance to facilitate live Bumblebee colony removal and relocation by trained individuals who have successfully completed Conflict Bees in Urban Dwellings – Part Two Removal Techniques.
  • To be able to give stakeholders information, advice and guidance to facilitate live Honeybee colony removal and relocation by trained individuals who have successfully completed Conflict Bees in Urban Dwellings – Part Two Removal Techniques.
  • To be able to signpost stakeholders to external expert advice if required.

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